Category Archives: advertising and promotion

Before The Elevator Pitch, What’s Your Elevator Tweet?

Elevator_UpI’ve spent the past two days at Launch 2013, a conference for tech start-ups.  While I have been blown away by the innovation and out-of-the-box thinking that is taking place at this event, there is one area that these entrepreneurs need to spend more time: thinking how to pitch their products.   Continue reading

Super Bowl Ads – the Final Score

touchdownThe game is over, and it had the all the drama, momentum swings and glitz that we expect from the Super Bowl.  And while we know who won on the field, it’s now time to look at the winners and losers from the advertising game.

Before I pass judgment, let me make a couple overall observations.

The Herd Mentality
It’s always interesting to see how certain products tend to get multiple advertisers competing with each other.  Car manufacturers are at the top of this list, with luxury sedans and mid-sized SUVs being the predominant vehicle types showing up.  For the most part, these were so indistinguishable from each other that nobody will remember anything about them by this weekend…while I did enjoy watching the VW Beetle “Get Happy” spot, there was one clear winner in the pack (see below).   There is always a lot of competition between sodas, but a surprising product category that has multiple brands competing with each other during the Super Bowl is men’s deodorants…they must feel that they can get some new customers, although I’m highly skeptical that they will even come close to seeing a return on this investment. Continue reading

Hey, let’s burn a couple million dollars on the Super Bowl

SuperBowl_XLVII_(2013)_logoAs we approach the big day this Sunday, everybody is getting ready for the main event – who will win the battle of the ads!  Both during and after the game, we will talk about the funniest, the cleverest, the cutest or the crassest commercials.  Brands will gain lots of exposure (a frequently mentioned benefit), but what does this actually equate to once the chatter is over and the money is spent?  If you spend $3-4 million dollars to air a commercial + another $1-2 million to produce it, there should be some major expectations that it generates serious payback.

I think there is way too much emphasis on brand reinforcement when it comes to Superbowl advertising.  We all know about the sugary sodas, beers, salty snacks and auto companies that show up year after year.  Do their commercials really change consumer behavior in a lasting way?  While they may get a quick spike of attention, the results are questionable.  As a story on America Public Media’s Marketplace shows, it’s difficult for people to even recall which brand is associated with many memorable commercials. Continue reading